Books for May

I know it’s been a bit quiet here over the past couple of months, but I feel like 2016 has been a really good year for new releases so far.  But it’s starting to calm down – there are a few books I want to get in May, but not as many as in previous months.

26067987Mary Balogh’s ONLY BELOVED (historical romance): I’ve been reading her Survivors’ Club series and enjoying it well enough, reflected by the fact I usually wait until my library reservations come through as opposed to buying.  This book wraps up the series – I’ve placed my library reservation!

From the legendary New York Times bestselling author of Only a Kiss and Only a Promise comes the final book in the rapturous Survivor’s Club series—as the future of one man lies within the heart of a lost but never-forgotten love…

For the first time since the death of his wife, the Duke of Stanbrook is considering remarrying and finally embracing happiness for himself. With that thought comes the treasured image of a woman he met briefly a year ago and never saw again.

Dora Debbins relinquished all hope to marry when a family scandal left her in charge of her younger sister. Earning a modest living as a music teacher, she’s left with only an unfulfilled dream. Then one afternoon, an unexpected visitor makes it come true.

For both George and Dora that brief first encounter was as fleeting as it was unforgettable. Now is the time for a second chance. And while even true love comes with a risk, who are two dreamers to argue with destiny?

Out now

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29244653Ashley Gardner’s THE ALEXANDRIA AFFAIR (historical mystery): I’ve had a soft spot for Egyptian settings ever since I fell for Elizabeth Peters’ Amelia Peabody books (I’m still keeping a ear out for rumours as to her final unpublished manuscript), and I probably will pick this up at some point.

Lucius Grenville at last persuades Captain Lacey to join him in an expedition to Egypt, to visit various ancient sites. Lacey is excited to go, though torn about leaving his new family. He discovers, though, that the burgeoning market for antiquities has made Egypt’s ancient history open for plunder, bringing forth ruthless men who will not stop short of murder for the sake of a fortune.

Out May 17

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26242354Lisa Kleypas’s MARRYING WINTERBORNE (historical romance): There’s a (unusual) historical theme to this month’s new releases for me – I felt like Lisa Kleypas’s previous book spent a lot of time setting up the Helen/Winterborne romance (and overshadowing the main relationship), so hopefully this book lives up to the promise.

A ruthless tycoon
Savage ambition has brought common-born Rhys Winterborne vast wealth and success. In business and beyond, Rhys gets exactly what he wants. And from the moment he meets the shy, aristocratic Lady Helen Ravenel, he is determined to possess her. If he must take her virtue to ensure she marries him, so much the better…

A sheltered beauty
Helen has had little contact with the glittering, cynical world of London society. Yet Rhys’s determined seduction awakens an intense mutual passion. Helen’s gentle upbringing belies a stubborn conviction that only she can tame her unruly husband. As Rhys’s enemies conspire against them, Helen must trust him with her darkest secret. The risks are unthinkable…the reward, a lifetime of incomparable bliss. And it all begins with…

Marrying Mr. Winterborne

Out May 31

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17927395Sarah J Maas’s A COURT OF MIST AND FURY (YA fantasy): I am on the fence for this (very likely a library reservation too) – I had fun reading the previous one, but I remember the doormat-y heroine also infuriating me at times.

Feyre survived Amarantha’s clutches to return to the Spring Court—but at a steep cost. Though she now has the powers of the High Fae, her heart remains human, and it can’t forget the terrible deeds she performed to save Tamlin’s people.

Nor has Feyre forgotten her bargain with Rhysand, High Lord of the feared Night Court. As Feyre navigates its dark web of politics, passion, and dazzling power, a greater evil looms—and she might be key to stopping it. But only if she can harness her harrowing gifts, heal her fractured soul, and decide how she wishes to shape her future—and the future of a world cleaved in two.

With more than a million copies sold of her beloved Throne of Glass series, Sarah J. Maas’s masterful storytelling brings this second book in her seductive and action-packed series to new heights.

Out now

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So not exactly a sterling month for new releases – any books you’re really excited about?

Books for June

June!  New books!  Need I say more.

Well, yes, actually, because I seem to have come out of my reading slump, and have been reading.  I hesitate to say that I’m reading a lot (pesky things like sleep and work are still getting in the way), but despite the fact it’s only the second week of June, I’ve finished reading quite a few new releases here.

22750124Martha WellsSTORIES OF THE RAKSURA VOLUME 2 (fantasy): This is Martha Wells’ second collection of novellas/short stories set in her Raksura world.  I loved this trilogy when I finally got around to reading these books last year (they were in my 2014 favourites) and I was delighted to hear that she was continuing to write more stories in the same universe.  This is one of the books I’ve raced through, and it may sound weird as they’re new-to-me stories, but they’re almost like comfort reads.  She delivers exactly what you’re expecting – there are no surprises, and I mean that in a good way.

Moon, Jade, and other favorites from the Indigo Cloud Court return with two new novellas from Martha Wells.

Martha Wells continues to enthusiastically ignore genre conventions in her exploration of the fascinating world of the Raksura. Her novellas and short stories contain all the elements fans have come to love from the Raksura books: courtly intrigue and politics, unfolding mysteries that reveal an increasingly strange wider world, and threats both mundane and magical.

“The Dead City” is a tale of Moon before he came to the Indigo Court. As Moon is fleeing the ruins of Saraseil, a groundling city destroyed by the Fell, he flies right into another potential disaster when a friendly caravanserai finds itself under attack by a strange force. In “The Dark Earth Below,” Moon and Jade face their biggest adventure yet; their first clutch. But even as Moon tries to prepare for impending fatherhood, members of the Kek village in the colony tree’s roots go missing, and searching for them only leads to more mysteries as the court is stalked by an unknown enemy.

Stories of Moon and the shape changers of Raksura have delighted readers for years. This world is a dangerous place full of strange mysteries, where the future can never be taken for granted and must always be fought for with wits and ingenuity, and often tooth and claw. With these two new novellas, Martha Wells shows that the world of the Raksura has many more stories to tell…

Out now

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24397828Nalini Singh‘s SHARDS OF HOPE (paranormal romance): I was debating whether this book was a buy or borrow, right up to the last moment when I caved and bought the Kindle version.  And yes, I’ve read it.  I haven’t loved her more recent Psy-Changeling books (hence the internal debate), but I thought this was the best one since the Hawke/Sienna book (which was, gosh, published back in 2011 – time flies).  There was quite a bit of repetition and the story felt a bit padded out, I thought the level of violence was slightly OTT, but I liked Aden and Zaira’s story more than I thought I would.

Awakening wounded in a darkened cell, their psychic abilities blocked, Aden and Zaira know they must escape. But when the lethal soldiers break free from their mysterious prison, they find themselves in a harsh, inhospitable landscape far from civilization. Their only hope for survival is to make it to the hidden home of a predatory changeling pack that doesn’t welcome outsiders.

And they must survive. A shadowy enemy has put a target on the back of the Arrow squad, an enemy that cannot be permitted to succeed in its deadly campaign. Aden will cross any line to keep his people safe for this new future, where even an assassin might have hope of a life beyond blood and death and pain. Zaira has no such hope. She knows she’s too damaged to return from the abyss. Her driving goal is to protect Aden, protect the only person who has ever come back for her no matter what.

This time, even Aden’s passionate determination may not be enough – because the emotionless chill of Silence existed for a reason. For the violent, and the insane, and the irreparably broken . . . like Zaira.

Rich, dark, sumptuous and evocative . . . bestselling author Nalini Singh is back with a stunning, dark and passionate new tale.

Out now

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25395582Sherwood Smith‘s LHIND THE SPY (YA fantasy): Sequel to her LHIND THE THIEF (which I’ve read – no idea why I haven’t reviewed it).  I’m reading this right now, and it’s actually taking some discipline to write this blog post as opposed to continuing with Lhind’s adventures.  Lots of fun so far.

In this sequel to Lhind the Thief, Lhind has gone from castoffs to silks, back alleys to palace halls—and is not having an easy time of it. That’s before she’s snatched by an angry prince she’d robbed twice, who is determined to turn her over to the enemy who frightens her most, the sinister Emperor Jardis Dhes-Andis.

When her own dear Hlanan comes to rescue her, it’s Lhind who has to do the rescuing, setting off a wild chase to fend off mercenaries and then to confront an entire army intent on invasion.

Lhind and Hlanan try to negotiate the perilous waters of a relationship while on the run—straight into a trap.

Just when Lhind is beginning to figure out where she might fit into the world, she finds herself alone again, surrounded by enemies, in one of the most dangerous courts in the world.

And she begins to find out who she really is.

Out now

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24684698KJ Charles‘ THE SECRET CASEBOOK OF SIMON FEXIMAL (M/M historical romance): I’ll buy anything KJ Charles writes. ‘Nuff said.

A story too secret, too terrifying—and too shockingly intimate—for Victorian eyes.

A note to the Editor

Dear Henry,

I have been Simon Feximal’s companion, assistant and chronicler for twenty years now, and during that time my Casebooks of Feximal the Ghost-Hunter have spread the reputation of this most accomplished of ghost-hunters far and wide.

You have asked me often for the tale of our first meeting, and how my association with Feximal came about. I have always declined, because it is a story too private to be truthfully recounted, and a memory too precious to be falsified. But none knows better than I that stories must be told.

So here is it, Henry, a full and accurate account of how I met Simon Feximal, which I shall leave with my solicitor to pass to you after my death.

I dare say it may not be quite what you expect.

Robert Caldwell
September 1914

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And then my maybes/library requests:

  • Erika Johansen‘s THE INVASION OF THE TEARLING (YA fantasy): Probably a library request.  I read the first book last year – thought it was a decent start, though over-hyped.
  • Garth Nix‘s TO HOLD THE BRIDGE (fantasy): A collection of his short stories.  I’ve read a few of his books (and liked), but have a few more unread on my Kindle – another one for the library.
  • Ashley Gardner‘s MURDER MOST HISTORICAL (mystery): Another collection of short stories.  I’ve liked her Captain Lacey historical mysteries (hey, I’ve read all nine of them), so I’ll get this at some point
  • Mary Balogh‘s ONLY A PROMISE (historical romance): I’ve requested this from the library.
  • Sophie Kinsella‘s FINDING AUDREY (YA): Ditto.  I’ve had good times reading her more recent releases, but I’m not entirely sure I want to splash out on a Kinsella hardcover, especially for her first(?) YA.

 

Books for July

Between Wimbledon reaching its climax and the Tour de France kicking off in Yorkshire over the weekend, I almost felt as though I’d reached my sports (spectating) limit.  We’ll pass on the World Cup because, well, I’m not a massive football fan – I’m one of those who was only persuaded down to the pub after work last week with the promise of sunshine and a G&T.  I’m impressed by the number of USians who appear to have gotten into umm… soccer though.

But regardless of your chosen sport, there was certainly plenty to watch over the last couple of weeks (unless of course you’re just not a sports fan, in which case, ouch), which is my rather rambling lead up to why this July new releases post is closer to being a mid-month than start-of-month post.  So – new releases this month:

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20822874KJ CharlesTHINK OF ENGLAND (historical m/m romance): I’ve enjoyed KJ Charles’ ventures into both paranormal m/m romance and (straight) romantic suspense (haven’t blogged about it yet, but I thought NON-STOP TILL TOKYO was very good – violence galore, yes, but an amazing sense of place).  So if she’s decided to take a step sideways into the historical m/m romance genre, I don’t really care – I’m totally buying.

Lie back and think of England…

England, 1904. Two years ago, Captain Archie Curtis lost his friends, fingers, and future to a terrible military accident. Alone, purposeless and angry, Curtis is determined to discover if he and his comrades were the victims of fate, or of sabotage.

Curtis’s search takes him to an isolated, ultra-modern country house, where he meets and instantly clashes with fellow guest Daniel da Silva. Effete, decadent, foreign, and all-too-obviously queer, the sophisticated poet is everything the straightforward British officer fears and distrusts.

As events unfold, Curtis realizes that Daniel has his own secret intentions. And there’s something else they share—a mounting sexual tension that leaves Curtis reeling.

As the house party’s elegant facade cracks to reveal treachery, blackmail and murder, Curtis finds himself needing clever, dark-eyed Daniel as he has never needed a man before…

Warning: Contains explicit male/male encounters, ghastly historical attitudes, and some extremely stiff upper lips.

Out now

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18007521Mary Balogh‘s THE ESCAPE (historical romance): I admitted to being slowly won over by Mary Balogh’s historicals a couple of posts back, so it’s no surprise that I’ve her new release on my radar.

In this poignant novel of longing and salvation, a hopeful widow and a resilient war hero discover the promise of love’s magic and new beginnings.
 
After surviving the Napoleonic Wars, Sir Benedict Harper is struggling to move on, his body and spirit in need of a healing touch. Never does Ben imagine that hope will come in the form of a beautiful woman who has seen her own share of suffering. After the lingering death of her husband, Samantha McKay is at the mercy of her oppressive in-laws—until she plots an escape to distant Wales to claim a house she has inherited. Being a gentleman, Ben insists that he escort her on the fateful journey.

Ben wants Samantha as much as she wants him, but he is cautious. What can a wounded soul offer any woman? Samantha is ready to go where fate takes her, to leave behind polite society and even propriety in her desire for this handsome, honorable soldier. But dare she offer her bruised heart as well as her body? The answers to both their questions may be found in an unlikely place: in each other’s arms.

Out now

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16045306Miranda Kenneally‘s BREATHE, ANNIE, BREATHE (NA romance): I like how Miranda Kenneally’s New Adult romances focus on a different sport in each book (except perhaps THINGS I CAN’T FORGET, which had religion at its heart, IIRC), so yay for a new Hundred Oaks book.  I have to mention the multiple cover changes for this book here (scroll to the bottom of the linked post) – I was amused that three different covers came out in fairly quick succession, though I have to say I really like the final one they settled on.

Annie hates running. No matter how far she jogs, she can’t escape the guilt that if she hadn’t broken up with Kyle, he might still be alive. So to honor his memory, she starts preparing for the marathon he intended to race.

But the training is even more grueling than Annie could have imagined. Despite her coaching, she’s at war with her body, her mind—and her heart. With every mile that athletic Jeremiah cheers her on, she grows more conflicted. She wants to run into his arms…and sprint in the opposite direction. For Annie, opening up to love again may be even more of a challenge than crossing the finish line.

Out July 15

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20426102Rachel Aaron‘s NICE DRAGONS FINISH LAST (urban fantasy): After whizzing through Rachel Bach’s (a.k.a. Rachel Aaron) space opera romp in the Paradox trilogy, I’m giving her fantasy another chance.  This one’s a self-pubbed UF (she talks about the why of self-publishing here) and I have to say I love the cover.

As the smallest dragon in the Heartstriker clan, Julius survives by a simple code: stay quiet, don’t cause trouble, and keep out of the way of bigger dragons. But this meek behavior doesn’t cut it in a family of ambitious predators, and his mother, Bethesda the Heartstriker, has finally reached the end of her patience.

Now, sealed in human form and banished to the DFZ–a vertical metropolis built on the ruins of Old Detroit–Julius has one month to prove to his mother that he can be a ruthless dragon or lose his true shape forever. But in a city of modern mages and vengeful spirits where dragons are seen as monsters to be exterminated, he’s going to need some serious help to survive this test.

He only hopes that humans are more trustworthy than dragons.

Out July 15

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12119529Ilona AndrewsMAGIC BREAKS (urban fantasy): An Ilona Andrews is always an auto-buy for me, and this time, a new Kate Daniels!  I don’t really need to say much more, do I?

No matter how much the paranormal politics of Atlanta change, one thing always remains the same: if there’s trouble, Kate Daniels will be in the middle of it…

As the mate of the Beast Lord, Curran, former mercenary Kate Daniels has more responsibilities than it seems possible to juggle. Not only is she still struggling to keep her investigative business afloat, she must now deal with the affairs of the pack, including preparing her people for attack from Roland, a cruel ancient being with god-like powers. Since Kate’s connection to Roland has come out into the open, no one is safe—especially those closest to Kate.

As Roland’s long shadow looms ever nearer, Kate is called to attend the Conclave, a gathering of the leaders from the various supernatural factions in Atlanta. When one of the Masters of the Dead is found murdered there, apparently at the hands of a shapeshifter, Kate is given only twenty-four hours to hunt down the killer. And this time, if she fails, she’ll find herself embroiled in a war which could destroy everything she holds dear…

Out July 29

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22444651KellyHunter_honeymoontrap_eBook_final-200x300Finally, two novellas (both out now) – Kelly Hunter‘s THE HONEYMOON TRAP and Sarina Bowen‘s BLONDE DATE .  Am linking to Kelly Hunter’s blog as the book doesn’t seem to be on Goodreads (I know, that sounds impossible, right?) – anyway, there is something about her writing that just works for me, so this is a no-brainer autobuy.  Sarina Bowen’s novella  is part of her Ivy Years series (NA college-set romance, in case you’re wondering), which I’ve been quietly enjoying.

Romance & Fantasy (yes, again)

It’s been the crazy-busy kind of week lately (as evidenced by lack of activity on this blog).  And well, Wimbledon starts this week, so I make no promises about posts in the next couple of weeks.

But it was one of those lovely lazy Sundays yesterday, and I spent some time posting on Goodreads about some books I read towards the end of last year (yes, only six months later – I’m catching up on my backlog…).  Here they are (with some additional thoughts in italics).

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Royal Airs (Elemental Blessings, #2)Royal Airs by Sharon Shinn

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

A decent read, but not one of Shinn’s best, IMO. The story was on the predictable side of things, and Rand/Josetta’s relationship felt a bit too much like insta-love. Having said that, I have such a soft spot for the world of Welce and its elemental blessings, and I’d love to see more in this world.

I wanted to like this more – a lot more.  Sharon Shinn’s previous books have set the standard in fantasy romance (see Samaria, Twelve Houses, etc) and the elemental blessings concept in this world appeals to my inner teen.  But the romance in this felt flat – not sure why. 

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I also raced through a trilogy that turned out to be one of my favourites of 2013.  I’d been meaning to read more of Martha Wells, and finally found myself with time on my hands, so I cracked open her Fall of Ile-Rien trilogy.  Totally satisfied my fantasy craving.  And it was one of those trilogies where the later books are full of twists and turns that make you see earlier events in a different light – I love those.

 

The Wizard Hunters (The Fall of Ile-Rien, #1)The Wizard Hunters by Martha Wells

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I loved the prequel, The Death of the Necromancer, but it took me a while to settle into this story. But once I did, it worked for me – well, strong fantasy with a subtle romance would obviously tick all my boxes. This was written almost ten years ago, and I thought its age showed slightly, but overall, good read.

 

The Ships of Air (The Fall of Ile-Rien, #2)The Ships of Air by Martha Wells

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

For a middle book in a trilogy, this one held up very well – there were some major twists in the story… but all made perfect sense in hindsight. Needless to say, I dove into the third book, The Gate of Gods, straight after.

 

The Gate of Gods (The Fall of Ile-Rien, #3)The Gate of Gods by Martha Wells

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The third book in a trilogy usually has a lot of expectations attached to it, and I’m glad to say that this one delivered for me. It was one of those unputdownable books – I was totally caught up in the story and invested in the outcome. Having said that (and despite this being a rather action-packed book), I didn’t think the plot was particularly suspenseful – but it was emotionally satisfying. So the perfect ending to the trilogy for me – though possibly with the caveat that I think you get even more out of the story if you’ve read the prequel, The Death of the Necromancer, first.

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I then read two Diana Peterfreunds (one under her Viv Daniels pseudonym):

One & Only (Canton, #1)One & Only by Viv Daniels

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I admit it – I picked this up purely because it was Diana Peterfreund writing New Adult, and I loved her Secret Society Girl books so much. Else I probably would have passed because the premise didn’t really grab me – so the fact that the story ended up working for me says much.

There was a bit too much of the “Yes, I totally am in lust with you” followed by “No, we really shouldn’t” (rinse/repeat) throughout the middle section of the book, but I did believe in Tess/Dylan’s connection. And I’d have liked to have had more on Tess’s parents, which to me was the more fascinating and complex relationship, but maybe Hannah’s story, Sweet & Wild, will reveal more.

Yessss… I wasn’t wild about the “falling in love with my secret half-sister’s boyfriend” conflict, but like I said, Diana Peterfreund’s writing got me over that.  I didn’t love this as much as the SSG books (okay, unfair comparison), but I’ll be getting the next.  I loved the SSG dedication in this book though. 

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Across a Star-Swept Sea (For Darkness Shows the Stars, #2)Across a Star-Swept Sea by Diana Peterfreund

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I loved the companion book For Darkness Shows the Stars, but this one didn’t work as well for me – I can’t quite put my finger on why, but there was something lacking with my connection with the protagonists and the world-building didn’t feel as in-depth as FDSTS. Having said that, it was a cleverly-written story (with an excellent ending), and kept me reading through to the end.

With this retelling, I’m not sure if I’d enjoyed this more had I read THE SCARLET PIMPERNEL first – certainly part of what I loved about FDSTS was how Diana Peterfreund kept the essence of PERSUASION, while making the story feel fresh and different, so I enjoyed the book from two separate angles.  I only know the vague outlines of PIMPERNEL, so it’s possible that a lot of the allusions flew over my head.

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The Temporary WifeThe Temporary Wife by Mary Balogh

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I’m not a massive Balogh fan – this was more of an impulse buy as the back cover copy appealed to me. And I’m glad I bought as the story ended up hitting the right spots for me – formulaic romance, yes, but with enough tweaks to make it different enough, and I liked the focus on family.

This actually kick-started my mini Balogh glom towards the end of 2013.  

2013: The Summary

Happy New Year!

Here’s my annual wrap-up post for 2013 (2012 summary for comparison) – it’s a long one, so settle in.

My Very Favourite Books of 2013

I’ve felt like this year hasn’t been a fantastic reading year for me in terms of keeper books, and looking back at the list of books I’ve read this year, the number of 5-star reads support that feeling – I’ve only had seven (compared to the usual ten or more) books on this list.  It’s a personal list and I’d be the first to admit that these aren’t necessarily technically perfect, but they’re the stories that just… work for me – I kind of wander around for a few days afterwards just thinking about the world and characters (please say I’m not the only one!).

Interesting (to me, anyway) things about this list

  • They’re all by new-to-me authors, so either my usual favourite authors didn’t wow me with their 2013 books or I had too high expectations for their releases – I suspect the actual answer’s somewhere between the two.
  • Three of them are for the final books in their respective series/trilogies – so if I’m being honest, the 5 stars are really for the series as a whole, as opposed to the book listed here.
  • I’m going old-school with this list – four out of the seven were released prior to 2013 (as you can probably tell by the some of the covers – love them!).

Enough rambling – here are my favourite books of 2013 (in the order in which I read them, more or less):

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Allison Parr‘s RUSH ME (new adult): I actually gave this 4 stars to start off with, but then (a) I kept on thinking about Rachael and Ryan and (b) did a re-read (I usually never do re-reads, much less in the same year), and loved their romance so much that I ended up bumping up my grade.  Escapism romance + messiness of first love/lust + NYC brought to life = keeper.

CS Pacat‘s CAPTIVE PRINCE Vols 1 and 2 (M/M fantasy romance): Listing both together, as they’re two halves of the same book, IMO, though it was really Volume 2 that elevated this series to one of my favourites of the year.  I’m excited that Berkley snapped up these self-pubbed books because it’s an amazing story and deserves a wider audience.  Although be warned, these books aren’t for everyone – they’re certainly trigger-y (at least, the first book is), but that incredibly intriguing Damen/Laurent relationship combined with court intrigue and politics took over my head for a few days, and I cannot wait to see where Volume 3 takes us.

Debra Doyle & James D MacDonald‘s BY HONOR BETRAY’D (SF): I had the first book in the Mageworlds series in my TBR pile forever, and finally got around to reading it – and then promptly glommed the rest of the trilogy.  I’ve a soft spot for space opera in general, but what elevated these books above the rest was the sheer twistiness of plot reveals.  Clever and excellent fun.

PB Ryan‘s A BUCKET OF ASHES (historical mystery): The first book transported me straight into 1860s Boston, and I was immediately hooked on not just the mysteries, but a slow-burning (and surely impossible) romance.  This sixth and final book was the culmination of the series-long romance arc – and PB Ryan totally delivered.

Julie Cross‘s LETTERS TO NOWHERE (YA): I was not expecting to enjoy this YA as much as I did.  The elite gymnastics aspect wasn’t just wallpaper – everything rang true, especially that positive yet competitive friendships which were portrayed to perfection.  Plus sweet romance and feelings that left a lump in your throat.

Kate Elliott‘s JARAN (SF): I’m not sure how I’ve not read this before, but I loved this old-school epic SF/fantasy hybrid, which was the first in the Jaran series.  Not just Tess & Ilya’s relationship (though that obviously kept me up late reading), but this whole foreign world came to life for me.

Martha Wells‘ THE GATE OF GODS (fantasy): This was the final book in her Fall of Ile-Rien trilogy and proved to be one of those unputdownable books for me.  It was the perfect ending to the series, and like JARAN, I was left wondering how I managed to miss out on these books earlier.

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New-to-Me Authors I’m Glad I Read in 2013

Apart from all of those listed above, here are the other new-to-me authors I enjoyed during the year:

SF/F

  • Ankaret Wells: Self-pubbed author, intriguing world-building but plotlines tend to wander on a bit
  • Helen S. Wright: Another old-school space opera gem – I thought A MATTER OF OATHS was lots of fun
  • Marko Kloos: Originally self-pubbed, his military SF novels will be published by Amazon’s 47North in 2014
  • Emma Bull: Only read a short story of hers, but liked it – her WAR FOR THE OAKS is meant to be a UF classic (and is in my TBR!)
  • Katriena Knights: Her UF NECROMANCING NIM was both fast-paced and sexy, and begs for a sequel

Romance

  • Elle Kennedy: Ménage stories are somewhat out of my comfort zone, but she sold me with HOTTER THAN EVER
  • Joanna Chambers: Historical M/M romance that felt authentic, which is a bit of a rarity
  • Alexis Hall: His M/M romance debut GLITTERLAND promises much to look forward to
  • KJ Charles: M/M romance in a historical fantasy setting – I’m looking forward to more in her A Charm of Magpies series

New Adult / Young Adult

  • Scarlett Dawn: I suspect her paranormal Forever Evermore series will be my new guilty pleasure in 2014
  • Diane Stanley: YA-veering-on-MG (or vice versa) fantasy, liked her Silver Bowl books, but thought there was potential for so much more
  • Sherry Thomas: Kind of surprised it took me this long to read one of her books – and also that it was a YA fantasy, not historical romance

Mystery

  • Ashley Gardner: Her Regency-set Captain Lacey series kept me pretty much occupied over October, which leads nicely on to…

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Author Most Glommed in 2013

Apart from the authors in my favourites list (I’m sounding like a broken record, sorry), I read my way through the first six of Ashley Gardner‘s historical mystery books – while these didn’t capture my imagination the way that PB Ryan’s series did, they were solid and showed a different side of London to the more usual glittering balls of the ton (and the first three are available in an e-bundle for £0.77  at the moment – you’re welcome).

I also read five Mary Baloghs (I know, I kept quiet about both of these authors over 2013, didn’t I?), prompted by the 2-in-1 reissues of her backlist.  I’m not yet a Balogh die-hard, but I’m starting to understand why her historical romances are favourites amongst so many readers.

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The Statistics

 


2013 2012 2011 2010 2009
# of books read 150 164 144 141 115
# published during current year 90 (60%) 78 (48%) 73 (51%) 77 (55%) 55 (48%)
# of authors read 100 103 91 88 71
# of new-to-me authors 41 (41%) 31 (30%) 26 (29%) 29 (33%) 22 (30%)
# of library books 14 (9%) 28 (17%) 24 (17%) 20 (14%) n/a
space space space space space space

I’m not surprised my total is down from 2012 – I thought it would be a lot lower, to be honest.  Yay for the number of new-to-me authors I branched out and read this year (and I was obviously rewarded for that, based on my lengthy list above of new-to-me authors I enjoyed) .

I was dreading the library books percentage – I pretty much stopped using my local library during the last quarter of the year.  But I think that was also driven by me reading more digital-only releases and from smaller/indie pubs – I tend to use my library for the higher-profile new releases in hardback (i.e. when I’m not entirely sure I want the book and I know the library will be ordering it), and there was fewer of these in 2013 for me.

Genre-wise, romance and fantasy pretty much made up two-thirds of what I read over 2013 (61 and 44 books respectively) – I suspect there was a fair few books that could fit into either though, bearing in mind they’re two of my favourite genres.

And finally, here’s how the year looked like for me:

2013

And that’s it (I’m glad I only write this once a year)!

I’m still in the process of adding all my 2013 reads onto Goodreads (I’m up to September at the moment), but the full 2013 list will be here once I’m done.